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Posts Tagged ‘Sayings of Jesus’

God Surprises 5

If we fail to acknowledge God at work in the ‘big events’ of our life, what is the likelihood that we will ever recognize him at work in the small, ordinary, everyday events of our life? Yes, it is a ‘step of faith’ – perhaps even a leap – for an individual to look at their life this way.  We are more prone to give Lady Luck, good fortune, or coincidence the credit than God.

It is perhaps the height of human hubris to refuse to give our Creator credit for anything good that happens in our life; let alone what good happens on earth in general. However, let something fall apart, a tragedy strike, catastrophe fall upon us or another part of our world and suddenly we want to point our finger heavenward and blame the Divine.  We want an explanation from God for our hurt and sorrow, even if we do it in doubt, “If there was a god, he/she would have prevented this!  That’s what I would have done if all the power of the universe were in my hands.

The Bible teaches us that, out of his sovereign will to run his creation or allow it to run according to the laws of creation he established, God permits his blessings to come to both the just and unjust of the world. It confounds those who think that they belong to a special religious club, which gives them privileges to God’s blessings and protections against bad things happening to them, that Jesus would teach us, “He makes His sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust” (Matthew 5:45, MKJV).  It does not fit our theology, so we avoid it.

However, Job was a man in the Old Testament who knew both the blessings and the trials that come in this life. He was a man who looked like he had everything in life.  He was the model of success.  A day came, however, when everything he had and more was ripped from his life: financial security, family, peace, and good health.  Standing on the brink of his trust in God staring into the abyss of doubt and despair, his wife encouraged him to abandon all hope and leap by offering him the advice, “Curse God and die” (Job 2:9).

At that moment, Job decided to take a step back from that abyss and offers this answer to his wife’s solution,Stop talking like a person who does not know God!  We accept the good things that God allows to come to us.  Shouldn’t we also accept the bad things that he allows to come to us?” (Job 2:10, my own paraphrase).  This seems to be the reverse side of the faith equation Jesus spoke of in the Gospel of Matthew (see above).  Instead of the sun and the rain, Job is thinking in terms of killing frosts and monsoons.  Everything that comes to us comes to us through what God allows.

Santa Claus with a little girl

Image via Wikipedia

This whole idea messes with our desire to have a god who is a benevolent benefactor handing out goodies to all his good children and handing out punishment to all his bad ones. However, this approach makes the Creator sound more like Santa Claus than a Divine Sovereign of the universe.  It also makes him petty and capricious.  In the end, we are left always trying to figure out how to keep God happy – be on his “nice list” – and on our side, lest we offend him somehow and get put on his “naughty list.”  After all, there are worse things than ‘lumps of coal’ in store for us if we do not stay on his good side, right?

The problem with this is that it makes the God of the universe as small as we are in our thinking and behavior.  Job seemed to understand this in the midst of his troubles. Jesus pointed us to a larger more complicated picture of God.  In his own day, many people who assumed they should have been on God’s ‘nice list’ were not and those who thought they were on God’s ‘naughty list’ were actually favored and shown mercy.  This really messed with the heads of the religious people of Jesus’ day and still messes with them today.  It is so unlike us and how we would do things.  And maybe that is just the point.

The key may not be what we focus on and weigh: whether events are good or bad for us.  It may be how we view them in light of our trust in God to work out all things for his purposes and his glory, not ours. This makes God bigger than us and our personal agendas or happiness.  God has a bigger picture and bigger story to tell.  We can allow our lives to be woven into that story or refuse.  Either way, it is all about the story of God’s glory revealed in all of creation.  Our redemption is a part of that story.  If we refuse, so will be our fall.

So, one of the keys to finding purpose in this life is to see how God is at work in all of our situations and the events that come to us – good or bad.

  • What is the story of faith and trust he wants to write through us?
  • How do the small acts of love, kindness and obedience add up to tell a larger story of God’s activity in our life?
  • When has he visited us or interrupted our lives in small or large ways to reveal his ways to us?
  • Who are the individuals in our lives with whom he wants us to weave our stories together?

And the questions and searching goes on.

A pinnacle for me in the realization of this was an experience that my wife and I had early on in our lives together. We were a young married couple just out of college.  I had just finished almost two-and-a-half years of being a youth pastor at Neighborhood Christian Center in Bremerton, Washington.  Sensing a change coming, I quit the position fully expecting the Lord to open up something right away.  At least, that what I sincerely believe was going to happen.

Kelly had just finished teaching at Bremerton Christian School. However, she had become pregnant with our first child and they had a policy of not allowing young mothers to teach.  This left us both unemployed.  However, we were still hopeful and expecting the good Lord to bless us and show us the way.

Soon, however, as the months clicked away, it became apparent that nothing was going to materialize as quickly as we thought. Our savings became depleted.  The last pay check from the youth pastor position and teaching position came and went.  It was August of 1987, our son was due to be born at the beginning of October, and we were out of money.

I started taking the Seattle-Bremerton ferry to look for a job in Seattle. Out of desperation, I signed on with an employment agency in hopes that they could find something for me.  Finally, I was signed on with a job with the Pay-n-Pac Corporation – a large chain of home improvement stores.  I was assigned to the Rainier Valley store in Seattle.  This meant a long commute.  While it offered hope down the road, it only added to our immediate financial burden since I would need money for commuting and couldn’t expect a paycheck for two weeks.

We had no idea what to do. We limped financially through the beginning of August.  But unpaid bills were piling up.  September’s rent was soon to be due.  We were desperate.  We prayed and asked God to help.  But our situation only seemed to grow worse and more desperate.  We were reticent about reaching out to family and friends for help.  For Kelly, the days at home alone and pregnant with our first child were depressing and unbearable.  For me, the long commutes to Seattle were depressing.  Instead of listening to the radio like usual, I spent most of the hour-plus commute complaining to God about our predicament.

Where are you God?  Why aren’t you answering us?  Why don’t you provide?  What about the promises you made to us in the Bible?  Do you care about us?  How are we supposed to make it?  Are you really there?  Are you even listening to us?  What have we done to make you angry?  I left me job because I thought you had a plan, did I not hear you right?  Was my ‘step of faith’ a ‘step of stupid’?  Why are you putting us through all of this?  Do you want us to homeless and broke?  After serving in ministry for these last few years, are you just going to leave us hanging in the wind?”  You get the picture.  It was pretty much an hour each way each day of writing my own imprecatory psalms to the Lord.  Only mine didn’t sing as sell as King David’s.

Fall Berries and Raindrops, September 2010

Fall Berries and Raindrops, September 2010 ©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

One day, while I was in the middle of my morning commute to Seattle’s Rainier Valley, a knock came to our door. It was early enough that Kelly was still in her pajamas.  Not knowing who it was that would be at our door in the morning, she looked through the peep-hole.  It turned out to be an elderly couple from the church we had just resigned from a couple months prior.  Bruce and Lois Wilkinson had become dear friends and a joy to be around.  He was retired from the Bremerton Shipyard.

Kelly wrapped herself in her bathrobe and opened the door to them.  “Good morning!” she greeted them.

Good morning,” Bruce answered.  “We have some things for you.”

And with that they began to bring in to our apartment bags and boxes of groceries.  Kelly was overwhelmed with the amount of food being brought in.  She continued to thank them profusely as the brought the items in from their car.

Finally, with the last bag of groceries brought in, Bruce and Lois turned to Kelly and said, “Our granddaughter and her husband got a hold of us the other day.  Apparently, they have been praying for you and felt led by the Lord to do something for you to help you guys out.”  He then handed Kelly an envelope.  “And we decided to add something to it ourselves,” Lois added.

We had come to know their granddaughter and her husband only briefly as he had been transferred to Guam by the Navy shortly after we had arrived at the church. Someone in Guam had been praying for us, felt led to “do something” for us, and acted upon it.  Pretty extraordinary when you take into consideration that we had shared with no one our situation.

Kelly looked surprised at first. Then, looking into Bruce and Lois’ smiling faces, began to cry.  She explained to them that they were truly an answer to prayer.  Little did either of us expect that an answer to our prayers would come via friends in Guam!  Bruce and Lois prayed for Kelly and I and our unborn son before they left.

After they left, Kelly put away the groceries. She was amazed at their generosity.  Then she sat down and opened the envelope.  It contained a check and cash.  Stunned, she added up the amount between the two.  Of course, the amount came to what we needed to pay August’s rent as well as September’s and catch up with all of our bills.

About that time, I arrived at work to one of my co-workers calling my name.

Hey, Ron!  You have a phone call.  Sounds like your wife,” they called out to me.

She never called me at work, so I worried, “What could it be?

Hi,” I tentatively greeted her.

Good morning,” she said cheerfully.  “I know you’re at work.  But, I just had to call and tell you.  You’ll never guess just what happened…

She was right.  I couldn’t.

Would I ever want to go through that experience again? No.  Have I gone through tough life situations since then?  Oh, yeah.  But what happened in August 1987 has helped me to learn and remember that even in the midst of our trials and troubles; God is weaving a story line bigger than just our parts.  In the midst of our troubles, someone else’s faith was being stretched into an act of obedience.  To minister to our discomfort and worry, someone else was being prodded to reach out in kindness, care and love.  So, on the good side and on the bad side of life’s experiences, God seems to be at work.

This perhaps is a key to discovering God at work in the big and small events of our life, whether they are good or bad. Solomon seemed to understand this spiritual axiom when he penned the proverb, “In whatever direction life’s road takes you look and listen for Him, and He will make your direction clear as you go” (Proverbs 3:6, my own paraphrase).  Life’s road can have some great stretches that bring us much joy.  But it can also have some rough patches and steep climbs that cause us grief.  Wherever you are, he is there.  Just look for him.

©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

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William M. Dyke was a young man who became blind at the young age of ten. Despite this handicap, he grew to be a very intelligent, witty and handsome young man. While attending graduate school in England, William met the daughter of an English admiral. The two fell in love and soon became engaged.

Though never having seen her, William loved his fiance very much. Shortly before the wedding, at the insistence of the admiral, William submitted to special treatment for his loss of sight. Hoping against hope, William decided to have the gauze from his eyes removed during the wedding ceremony. He wanted the first thing he saw to be his wife’s face.

As the bride came down the aisle, William’s father started unwinding the gauze from around his head and eyes – still not knowing if the operation would be a success. With the unwrapping of the last circumference, William looked into the face of his new bride for the first time. “You are more beautiful than I ever imagined,” he said.

Hoar Frost on Branch, Winter 2008, Grand Forks, North Dakota

Hoar Frost on Branch, Winter 2008, Grand Forks, North Dakota ©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

Jesus told His disciples, “Blessed are those who believe in me, and yet have not seen me.”  Many have come to faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and have grown to love him.  They have done this without ever seeing Jesus in a physical form. They have maintained their loving relationship with the Lord despite hardship, in trials, tests, and tribulation. They have remained faithful to him and long to one day see him face to face.

The Bible promises that there will one day be a time when we will see Jesus personally and up close.  Like the young groom, though we have never seen Jesus, it will be worth the years of darkness we have endured to “see him as he is” (1 John 3:2).

This sightless faith is not based upon only our imagination.  We have the words of the One who loves us written for to read and ruminate over.   We also have the testimony of friends and the saints who have gone before us who tell us how wonderful this loving relationship is for us.  We also have the Gospel testimony of those who actually have seen him, held him, and heard him.  We can trust their witness to his reality and goodness.

Right now, our eyesight is darkened. But someday, one day soon, our sight will be fully restored. The apostle Paul tells us that, “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, and no mind has imagined the things that God has prepared for those who love him” (2 Cor. 2:9).  When that day does come, like the young William given his sight, we too will exclaim, “You are more beautiful than I ever imagined!”

©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

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Engaging A World

This is the time of year when many churches, at least Assemblies of God churches, hold an annual business meeting.  It is an annual report to the members of the congregation from the pastor(s), deacon board, and church leaders.  The previous year’s and next year’s budget is reviewed and approved.  Reports on church events and happening from ministry leaders are received.  Everyone, especially, anticipates the senior pastor’s report on the congregation, which relates the advances of he previous year and the hopeful future of the next.

As a senior pastor, leading these meetings could be a challenge.  Coming to a new congregation, it was always curious to me how these events were misused and abused by church leaders and congregants alike.  I always determined to set a different tone and expectations for these meetings.  In twenty-plus years of being involved in them, I never had a bad annual business meeting (Thank the Lord!).

I have heard stories of meetings that were contentious and troublesome.  Decisions came to depend on “pre-business meeting” politics.  Leaders railroaded there agendas through the decision making process.  Congregants ended up in yelling matches with the churches leaders or one another.  Most churches I stepped into at one level or another violated their own Constitution & Bylaws in moving the meeting’s date, electing officers, approving (or disapproving) pastoral continuance, along with a number of other things.

It is no wonder that so many people today are soured toward the church as an institution, denomination, or organization.  Many of us cannot even run a business meeting in “decency and order”.  I am not surprised that many people attending church today refuse to become members of their church because of their bad experiences.  There reason is always, “I don’t want to get involved in church politics.”  And who can blame them.

There are many reasons for a church to slide into such petty and meaningless schemes and unhealthy relationships.  However, let me focus on one that I believe may be the biggest reason.  It is simply this:  A church body that has slid so low in its relationships has done so because it is unengaged in the Kingdom of God and its mission.  It has become self-focused.  It has turned inward to war against itself rather than war against the kingdom of darkness that surrounds it.  James, the brother of Jesus, in his New Testament letter warned the church that this will only lead the church to “devour one another.”

This brings us back to a church’s annual business meeting.  How it is run and what its focus becomes can be a symptom of a larger problem.  I have sat through too many business meetings as a parishioner where the most important things talked about was the next church maintenance project, the selection of a color for furniture, the proper setting for the temperature in the sanctuary, and what kinds of foods should be served at the “Fellowship Hour”.

Other than the building, everyone was satisfied to know that the number of “butts and bucks” coming into the church was relatively unchanged or slightly improved.  A small decline in those numbers did not warrant alarm since the church experienced those before.  An alarm was only set off only if there was a mass exodus of those “butts and bucks”.  Only then did the pastor need to start to sweat the security of his job.

If these things are the only focus of an annual business meeting, the days are numbered for a congregation.  It will not be long before inward focus upon personal comforts and preferences become the main talking points in every gathering.  The church has lost its focus and reason for being.  Jesus did not say, “I will build my church and the gates of hell will not spoil its convenience and comfort.”  No.  He said, “I will build my church and the gates of hell will not prevail against it.”  The church is made to be engaged in warfare.

I propose that any church’s annual business meeting or congregational meeting should focused on two simple things:  First, reporting what God has done in His Kingdom to accomplish His Mission in His world through His people and through His Church the previous year.  And, second, projecting what the church leadership team – pastor(s), deacons, ministry leaders – prayerfully believes God wants done in His Kingdom to accomplish His Mission in His world through His Church the next year.  Admittedly, those are tougher things to report and project!

The focus will necessarily be upon how the church was engaged in its mission to the world.  No reports from its leaders will be sufficient that just lists events and activities.  Keeping busy for the Lord is not an indication of fulfilling the church’s mission.  Activities do not equate to Kingdom engagement!  Money collections do not indicate Kingdom involvement!  It requires a congregation and its leaders to ask the hard questions:

  • How many of us were engaged with our time, treasure and talents in God’s mission in the world?
  • How many who were unengaged in God’s mission the previous year became engaged in it this last year?
  • How many were trained for a specific mission in God’s Kingdom to be obedient to carry out the task He has called them to do for Him?
  • How many of those in our community who were unengaged with the Kingdom of God before this last year became engaged with the Kingdom of God through our church’s efforts or the efforts of an individual from our church?
  • How many of those outside our church did we engage with the Kingdom of God – locally, nationally or internationally?
  • In what specific ways did our church or individuals from our church engage our larger local community with the Kingdom of God through acts of service – feed the hungry, cloth the naked, care for the orphan, care for the widow, look after those in prison, stand against injustice?
  • What persons in our community are unengaged with the gospel that we can reach out to by serving them and sharing God’s love in order to engage them with the Kingdom of God?

These questions – and there are others that could be asked along these lines – help us to celebrate what God is doing in and through the Body of Christ.  They keep everyone’s eyes upon the most important mission of a church – glorifying God by lifting up His Son, Jesus Christ.  It helps everyone to realize that there are more important things than color coordination, room temperatures, and choices between desserts or salads.  The important task of sharing God’s love is never done.  Yet, when it is done in faith and obedience it should be celebrated.  That becomes the reason for holding an annual meeting in the first place.

The church exists to engage the world with the Kingdom of God by sharing His story and revealing His glory.  We cannot do that if we are focused only upon “butts, bucks, and buildings.”  We will reach for what we measure.  If we measure success in terms of personal comfort and convenience, then that is what we will always reach for first.  However, if we measure in terms of personal and corporate engagement of the Kingdom of God with the world, then that is what we will always try to attain.  So, who wants to give the next annual report?

©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

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Many years ago, I heard the story of a lady in an airport who bought a book to read and a package of cookies to eat while she waited for her plane.  After she had taken her seat in the terminal and gotten engrossed in the book, she noticed that the man one seat away from her was fumbling to open the package of cookies on the seat between them.

She was so shocked that a stranger would eat her cookies that she did not really know what to do, so she just reached over and took one of the cookies and ate it.  The man did not say anything but soon reached over and took another.  Well, the woman was not going to let him eat them all, so she took another, too.

When they were down to one cookie in the package, the man reached over, broke the cookie in half, and got up and left.  The lady could not believe the man’s nerve.  How could anyone be so rude.  The incident upset her but soon the announcement came to board the plane.

Turkey Vulture on the Beach, Pacific City Beach, Oregon, Summer 2009

Turkey Vulture on the Beach, Pacific City Beach, Oregon, Summer 2009 ©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

Once the woman was aboard, still angry at the man’s audacity and puzzling over the incident, she reached into her purse for a tissue.  It suddenly dawned on her that she really should not judge people too quickly or too harshly – for there in her purse lay her still-unopened package of cookies!

Someone rightly said, “Most of us are umpires at heart; we all like to call balls and strikes on somebody else.”  Jesus challenged us.  He said, “Do not judge others.  In the same way you judge others you will be judged, with even greater severity!”  In God’s kingdom, grace and mercy has been extended to everyone.  Let’s keep passing it on.

©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

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