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Posts Tagged ‘Palouse Falls’

The Russian literary giant, Leo Tolstoy, once wrote a story about a successful peasant farmer who was not satisfied with his lot.  He wanted more of everything.  Here is how Tolstoy tells the story:

One day a farmer received a novel offer.  For 1000 rubles, he could buy all the land he could walk around in a day.  The only catch in the deal was that he had to be back at his starting point by sundown.  Early the next morning he started out walking at a fast pace.  By midday, he was very tired, but he kept going, covering more and more ground.

Well into the afternoon, he realized that his greed had taken him far from the starting point.  He quickened his pace and as the sun began to sink low in the sky, he began to run; knowing that if he did not make it back by sundown the opportunity to become an even bigger landholder would be lost.  As the sun began to sink below the horizon, he came within sight of the finish line.

Gasping for breath, his heart pounding, he called upon every bit of strength left in his body and staggered across the line just before the sun disappeared.  He immediately collapsed, blood streaming from his mouth.  In a few minutes, he was dead.  Afterwards, his servants dug a grave.  It was not much over six feet long and three feet wide.”

The title of Tolstoy’s story was: “How Much Land Does a Man Need?” (Adapted from Bits & Pieces, November, 1991.)  In the end, Tolstoy suggests, all a man really owns is a 6-foot by 3-foot piece of earth, so we are better off putting our confidence elsewhere.

Jesus, like Tolstoy, warns us (Matthew 6:19 – 24, 33) that we had better not put our trust in the promise of materialism.  If we do, we will be sadly disappointed.  Instead, there is something of eternal value that we can give our lives to pursue.  Anything we forfeit here on earth to gain what is in heaven will be returned to us there 100 times over (Matthew 19:29) along with eternal life!

Unfortunately, the western church in particular has drifted away from this teaching of Jesus.  Like first century Judaism, we associate material blessings with God’s favor.  Yet, very few people as well as nations have ever passed the prosperity test (Deuteronomy 8:8 – 10; 31:20; Jeremiah 5:7; Hosea 13:6).  The antidote to the poison of material envy and greed is “seek first His Kingdom and righteousness and all these things will be added unto you” (Matthew 6:33).

However, this is not a prescription for poverty either.  We are not more spiritual if we are poor – or act poor because we do not want people to think we have anything, which is hypocrisy.  Instead, in abundance or in want, the Lord wants us to trust him for all our needs.  He wants to use us to pour out his riches and grace upon “all nations” so that through us all people will know that He is God.  Like Abraham, he was to bless us so that we can be a blessing!

Nowhere is this more evident than in the churches of nations of the two-thirds world that are marked by material poverty but spiritual abundance in revival, signs and wonders, and miracles.  These saints do more with less for the Kingdom of God, while the American church does less with more.  While we are rich in available materials and resources, we are growing more and more Biblically illiterate and spiritually impoverished.  Thinking that we are rich and blessed, we are truly “blind, naked, and poor.”

Waitsburg Tombstone

Waitsburg Tombstone ©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2009)

While in Albania, I saw a church that was struggling with the simple resources that we take for granted everyday and every Sunday.  Can you imagine attempting to teach Sunday school or disciple without materials in your own language?  Can you imagine a church without any resources to pay for a staff of pastors and office help to keep ministry going?  Can you imagine doing Children’s ministry without any props or tools?

This is what I witnessed in Albania.  Yet, I saw a vibrant church in prayer, reaching lost souls, fellowship, and growing future leaders.  I witnessed creative people and pastors inspired by God who gathered dozens of children to teach them about Christ.  I saw the church gather for prayer and then “hit the streets” to find people to pray for and possibly be a witness to them about the love of Jesus.

My family has paid a price for my trips abroad to Albania and India.  Seeing such poverty among the world’s poorest of the poor ruins a person.  It gives one a jaundiced eye toward our western materialism and consumerism.  As such, for the past several Christmases we have not exchanged gifts.  We have not given gifts.  Plus, we have asked our friends and relatives to help us express Christmas in a new way.

Every year we pick a world poverty problem to target and give towards efforts that attempt to meet it.  We have supported homes for girls rescued from forced prostitution; bought and put together medical kits for AIDS patients; bought chickens for a impoverished family.  This year we are buying a goat to be given to a family in need.

This is a great time of year to ask ourselves:  How much stuff do we need to be successful?  How many material things do we need to feel God’s care and love?  How long do we wait until we have the earthly things we need so that we can answer God’s call to bless others?  How much of this world’s stuff are we dependent upon for our personal happiness?  How much “earth” does one need?

©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2009)

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Many, if not all, of you know about my love for coffee – all things Starbucks or Caribou in particular.  I love its smell.  I love grinding my own coffee beans and brewing fresh java to drink throughout the day.  I love trying new beans and new blends of coffee.

Well, then, imagine my surprise when I came across the following article on an uncommon coffee:

“Thanks to the coffee culture explosion, connoisseurs are now proactively seeking new twists on their beloved bean-based beverage.  Cappa-this, frappa-that, double mocca doodah – the permutations are endless….  [Nevertheless] Civet Coffee, also known as Kopi Luwak, is indeed the most astonishing… coffee we’ve ever tasted.

The primary reason for Civet Coffee’s distinctive taste is that it’s been partially fermented by passing through the digestive system of a Sumatran Civet Cat (paradoxurus hermaphroditis).  No, really!  Basically, this feral feline prowls Sumatran coffee plantations at night, choosing to eat only the finest, ripest cherries.  The stones (which eventually form coffee beans) are then collected by sifting through the Civet’s “number twos.”

Revered for its luscious chocolatey flavour Civet Coffee is totally safe …and delicious.  Plus there’s no discernable aftertaste. … Put the kettle on!”  (http://www.firebox.com/index.html?dir=firebox&action=product&pid=1077)

That’s the straight p scoop on a rare coffee!

I laughed when I came across this article.  What will people come up with next?  How about you?  Would you consider drinking such a strange brew?  Does the thought of where it came from bother you somewhat?  I bet there are a few daredevils among us who would take a sip or drink a cup!

Palouse Falls Gorge

Palouse Falls Gorge ©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2009)

Jewish religious leaders in Jesus’ day were very concerned about coming in contact with things that would defile them and make them unable to go into the Temple and perform their religious duties.  However, Jesus said, “It’s not what a man touches or eats that defiles him, but what comes out of his heart and mouth” (Matthew 15:11-20).

Jesus also said, “A person speaks from what is in their heart.  A good person speaks good things and an evil person evil things.  People will give an account on the day of judgment for every evil and careless word spoken” (Matt. 12:34-37).

If drinking from a brew passed through and out of the intestines of a Civet Cat bothers us, how much more should those things come out of our mouths – instead of in them!  Among the list of all the evil sins that prevent people from entering the Kingdom of righteousness are things that come out of our own mouths: false testimony, slander, gossip, lies, outbursts of anger, and arrogant boasting.

It is no wonder that the book of Proverbs constantly warns us about what we say.  Keep your spiritual garment of righteousness clean by taking the caution of Scripture to heart, “Guard your mouth!”  Be as concerned with what comes out of it as what you put into it.  What you say to other people about other people is more serious than a cup of Civet Coffee!

©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2009)

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Rick Joyner, in his book There Were Two Trees In the Garden, gives us an example of Satan’s strategy to keep God’s people under his dominion:  DEPRESSION, leads to DISORIENTATION, then LOSS OF VISION, which leads to COMPROMISE, which finally brings DEFEAT to the purpose of God for His people.  Does that sound familiar to you?  Joyner uses some Biblical examples as illustrations of his point.

When tempted by Pharaoh to come to a compromise, Moses held his course.  So Pharaoh gave in a little – – “sacrifice . . . within the land”.  This seems to be a familiar strategy of our spiritual enemy.  When Satan sees that we are determined to serve the Lord, he will then try to make us think that we can serve God even though we remain under bondage to his ways.

How many times have we said or heard other people say, “I know it’s wrong, but I know God loves me anyway.”  Interestingly, God can still be God while we remain in spiritual bondage.  We can recognize him and worship him as God while still in spiritual oppression.  However, what he truly desires for us is to worship him in freedom.

God countered this tempting compromise with further demonstrations of his power.  Pharaoh countered with another strategy of compromise – – “go . . . only do not go far away”.  Sound familiar also?  Our spiritual enemy’s next strategy is to keep us in as much bondage as possible.  In this case, this was his attempt to get Israel to lose her vision of the Promised Land.  But God called Israel not to just leave Egypt, but to go all the way to the Promised Land.

How many times have we tried to compromise with an addiction by “tapering off”?  How many times have we tried to help someone who simply couldn’t let go of the past?  These are all ways in which the enemy of our souls try to convince us to “not go too far” with our spiritual zeal for the Lord.  Complete obedience is discouraged for some sort of lukewarm status quo.

Palouse Falls Drainage October 2009

Palouse Falls Drainage October 2009 ©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2009)

Finally, Pharaoh offered – – “Go serve the Lord [notice no prerequisites!]; only let your flocks and herds be detained”.  Their spiritual oppressor wanted them to leave something in “Egypt” because he knew that where their treasure was so their hearts would be also.  As a result, he was attempting to guarantee their return to bondage.  The same temptation is worked against us today.  However, we too must declare as Moses did, “not a hoof will be left behind!”  In other words, we must be unrelenting in our determination to be utterly free of sin’s dominion over us or anything that is ours.  Compromise on any level with Satan, sin, or the world spells D-E-F-E-A-T for the people of God.

If you remember the rest of the story, Israel was only freed by the power of God.  We too must understand that we will never be set free by the permission of Satan, by our ability to compromise with our sinful desires, or even by our own steadfastness against temptation.  Instead, just like Israel, our freedom will come only by the power of God displayed in the true Passover sacrifice of the Lamb.

So, the question for every believer, just as it was for the children of Israel, is this: To what extent are you willing to obediently follow God to be truly free?  Remember, it was Israel who cried out to God to be free.  But it was also Israel who wrestled with God’s method to bring freedom to them.  How like us!  Like Israel, we will only realize our destiny to be free from spiritual bondage and oppression only by following the Lord obediently and without compromise.

©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2009)

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