Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Helping the Poor’

A few years ago, when I was pastoring a church in West Richland, Washington, I received a phone call from someone who needed help with rent.  As much as I wanted to help this person, our church’s benevolence budget was way over drawn as it was and there were no monies available anywhere else.

I asked, “Have you tried the various help organizations in our community?”  The answer was affirmative.  However, they were not able to get the help they needed.  I felt helpless.  All I could do was offer a few suggestions, words of encouragement, and a prayer.

The Tri-City community is blessed to have so many help organizations for those in need:  Martha’s Cupboard, Salvation Army, Saint Vincent DePaul, Union Gospel Mission, the local food banks and many others.  Volunteers who just have a big heart to help people in need staff these.  However, their resources are also often limited and overburdened too.

Like many churches in the Tri-cities area of Washington State, our church got its fair share of calls from people who needed help.  Sometimes, they were systematically desperately going through the phone book calling churches.  Other times, they are calling blind, hoping for a kind voice and helping hand.

Sure, there are the ‘frequent fliers:’ people who abuse the system and live dependent upon the benevolence of others.  But many more people are sincerely in need.  Often the help they need is only temporary, until a job, a place to live or other steady help is obtained.

Most often, it is the working poor – those who have jobs but the pay is inadequate to meet even their basic needs from month to month.  Then, when they suffer a financial catastrophe like the car breaking down, a hospitalization or a few days missed from work due to sickness, they are in need of outside help to get them through the month.

Multnomah Creek Above Multnomah Falls, Spring 2010

Multnomah Creek Above Multnomah Falls, Spring 2010 ©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

In all of this, I see first hand the wonderful advantage of belonging to a church family.  The church family provides a wonderful safety net in times of distress and crisis.  It becomes like an extended family that rallies support and help.

Within the churches that I have been involved in over the years, we have showered food upon families financially strapped; helped get cars fixed that were depended upon for work; chipped in together to help with medical bills; and volunteered to take care of children during a family crisis.

I know for a fact that this is repeated many times over in most, if not all, of our churches around the country and even the world.  In the community of faith, we take care of one another because we love one another.  Above and beyond a benevolent budget, we will spontaneously extend ourselves to help one another.

Your church family is your best source of help.  Develop those relationships with your own expressions of love and care for the others there.   Someday it will come back to you.

If you have not made an effort to be a part of a church family, now is the time!   There will come a time when you will need someone else’s shoulder for comfort, arm for strength or heart for courage.  Then is not the time to depend upon your fingers to find help in the Yellow Pages.  Then is the time to have church friends and family to call.

©Weatherstone/Ron Almberg, Jr. (2010)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: